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A rooster crows in a new day at Back Forty Farms in Nampa, Idaho. The rising price of eggs as well as shortages in some areas have created enormous demand for Back Forty's freeze dried eggs. Back Forty Farms hide caption

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Back Forty Farms

Food

America's eggs-istential crisis

Eggs have roughly tripled in price in the last few years. Now a raft of competitors are hoping to lure Americans away from their beloved breakfast food.

A rooster crows in a new day at Back Forty Farms in Nampa, Idaho. The rising price of eggs as well as shortages in some areas have created enormous demand for Back Forty's freeze dried eggs. Back Forty Farms hide caption

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Back Forty Farms

Mung bean omelet, anyone? Sky high egg prices crack open market for alternatives

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Critics say Snap, the maker of Snapchat, needs to do more to stop on-line drug dealers. The company told NPR it's improving safety measures and working with law enforcement. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Social media platforms face pressure to stop online drug dealers who target kids

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Clergy sex abuse survivor and victim's advocate Juan Carlos Cruz first met Pope Francis in 2018 when a group of survivors of abuse was invited to the Vatican. Andres Kudacki/AP hide caption

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Andres Kudacki/AP

Pope Francis' LGBTQ comments are not surprising but sincere, gay Vatican adviser says

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A sign held up by a demonstrator says "MOORE V. HARPER: A WEAPON TO OVERTURN ELECTIONS" at a December rally outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. Mariam Zuhaib/AP hide caption

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Mariam Zuhaib/AP

The Supreme Court is weighing a theory that could upend elections. Here's how

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