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Major flooding has hit Kenya in November. The disasters are likely intensified by climate change, and are causing ongoing health issues across the region. World leaders are discussing the health impacts of climate change at the COP28 climate meeting in Dubai this month. AFP via Getty Images/LUIS TATO hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images/LUIS TATO

Health is on the agenda at UN climate negotiations. Here's why that's a big deal

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COP28 President Sultan Ahmed al-Jaber attends the opening session of the climate conference. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Big Oil Leads at COP28

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Climate envoys John Kerry of the U.S. and Xie Zhenhua of China met in California in November. As the world's two-largest greenhouse gas emitters, agreement between the two countries is considered key for significant developments at the UN climate summit. William Vasta/The Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands hide caption

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William Vasta/The Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands

At climate summit, nations want more from the U.S.: 'There's just a trust deficit'

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After getting hit with Hurricane Irma in 2017, Antigua and Barbuda is still recovering. It's one of many countries that will need hundreds of millions of dollars to prepare for stronger storms and other climate impacts. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

This GOES-East GeoColor satellite image taken June 2 shows Tropical Storm Arlene, the first named storm of the 2023 Atlantic hurricane season. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via AP hide caption

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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via AP

Martha Durr, seen at her home in Lincoln, Nebraska, left her job earlier this month as the state's principal communicator of climate information. "It gets draining over time," she said. Elizabeth Rembert/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Elizabeth Rembert/Harvest Public Media

Weather experts in Midwest say climate change reporting brings burnout and threats

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This photo provided by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, from a remote camera set by biologist Chris Stermer, shows a wolverine in the Tahoe National Forest near Truckee, Calif., on Feb. 27, 2016, a rare sighting of the elusive species in the state. Scientists estimate that only about 300 wolverines survive in the contiguous U.S. Chris Stermer/California Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP, File hide caption

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Chris Stermer/California Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP, File

Summers could get dramatically hotter if the world fails to slow the pace of climate change. Brent Jones/NPR hide caption

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Brent Jones/NPR

3 climate impacts the U.S. will see if warming goes beyond 1.5 degrees

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Wind turbines generate electricity off the coast of England. World leaders will meet later this week in Dubai to discuss global efforts to reduce emissions of planet-warming pollution and transition to renewable energy sources. Frank Augstein/AP hide caption

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Frank Augstein/AP

Taylor Swift fans wait for the doors of Nilton Santos Olympic stadium to open for her Eras Tour concert amid a heat wave in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Saturday, Nov. 18, 2023. A 23-year-old Taylor Swift fan died Friday night after suffering from cardiac arrest due to heat at the concert, according to a statement from the show's organizers in Brazil. Silvia Izquierdo/AP hide caption

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Silvia Izquierdo/AP

Emissions from a power plant in Fairbanks, Alaska, in 2022. Global emissions of planet-warming greenhouse gases increased between 2021 and 2022, according to a new report from the United Nations. Mark Thiessen/AP hide caption

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Mark Thiessen/AP

The USFS is proposing changing a rule that would allow the storage of carbon dioxide pollution under national forests and grasslands. It's controversial. Julia Simon/NPR hide caption

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Julia Simon/NPR

The U.S. has a controversial plan to store carbon dioxide under the nation's forests

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Tourists walk around the base of the Washington Monument as smoke from wildfires in Canada casts a haze of the U.S. Capitol on the National Mall in June of this year. Air pollution alerts were issued across the United States due to the fires. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

3 major ways climate change affects life in the U.S.

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Pope Francis attends the welcoming ceremony of World Youth Day (WYD) in Lisbon on August 3, 2023. Pope Francis urged young people to focus on caring for the planet and fighting climate change, calling for an "integral ecology" that melds environmental protection with the fight against poverty and other social problems. Patricia de Melo Moreira/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patricia de Melo Moreira/AFP via Getty Images