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This areal view shows rows of boats used for harvesting salt in Lake Retba in Senegal in 2021. Marco Longari /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Marco Longari /AFP via Getty Images

The landslide in Sitka, Alaska on August 18th, 2015 happened after a morning of heavy rainfall. A three-hour rain fall total was an important data point to aid scientists in developing an early warning system. Jacyn Schmidt hide caption

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Jacyn Schmidt

Predicting Landslides: After Disaster, Alaska Town Turns To Science

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Lorraine Arroyo Román serves "asopao" during a protest against LUMA Energy in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico on Saturday. Román is illuminated by the lights of police vehicles. Gabriella N. Báez for NPR hide caption

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Gabriella N. Báez for NPR

Lorraine Arroyo Román sirve "asolapo" durante una protesta contra LUMA Energy en Aguadilla, Puerto Rico el Sábado. Lorraine es iluminada por las luces de los carros de policía. Gabriella N. Báez para NPR hide caption

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Gabriella N. Báez para NPR

Monica Medina, assistant secretary of state for oceans and international environmental and scientific affairs is pictured on Sept. 20 in New York City. She will take on additional responsibilities as an envoy on biodiversity and water resources. Monica Schipper/Getty Images for WWF Internation hide caption

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Monica Schipper/Getty Images for WWF Internation

Hurricane Ian left debris in Punta Gorda, Fla., after it made landfall. Storms like Ian are more likely because of climate change. Ricardo Arduengo/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AFP via Getty Images

Climate change makes storms like Ian more common

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This photograph, taken on February 24, 2014 during an aerial survey mission by Greenpeace in Indonesia, shows cleared trees in a forest located in the concession of Karya Makmur Abadi, which was being developed for a palm oil plantation. Environmental group Greenpeace on February 26 accused US consumer goods giant Procter & Gamble of aiding the destruction of Indonesian rainforests. BAY ISMOYO/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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BAY ISMOYO/AFP via Getty Images

Few large grasslands remain intact. Though they play a huge role in limiting the effects of climate change, they are threatened and tend to have few protections. Tracy Kessner hide caption

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Tracy Kessner

A Nissan electric vehicle recharges at a Power Up fast charger station on April 14, 2022, in Pasadena, Calif. California has more chargers than any other state in the U.S., but the federal government is trying to expand charger access across the country. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Families gather in a playground with a splash pad and swings in Philadelphia's Fairmount Park. Philadelphia has multiple projects underway to make this and other large parks in the city more resilient to heat and other effects of climate change. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

A downed tree from Post-Tropical Storm Fiona sits in the front yard of a home on Sept. 24 in Irish Cove, Nova Scotia on Cape Breton Island in Canada. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Canada's Atlantic provinces begin to recover from historic damage caused by Fiona

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A home faces high winds caused by post Tropical Storm Fiona in Port aux Basques, Newfoundland and Labrador on Saturday. The home has since been lost. Rene Roy/Wreckhouse Press via AP hide caption

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Rene Roy/Wreckhouse Press via AP

Activists unfurled a banner calling David Malpass a climate denier on the World Bank headquarters after he refused to say if he believed man-made emissions contributed to global warming. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

A late Triassic-era rausuchian, one of the rival reptile lineages who lost out to the dinosaurs. Dmitry Bogdonav/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Dmitry Bogdonav/Wikimedia Commons