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Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., center, with Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., left, and Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington on Wednesday. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

U.S. Abrams tanks participate in a live fire demonstration during training exercises in Poland in September 2022. President Biden announced Wednesday that the U.S. will be sending 31 Abrams tanks to Ukraine. Germany also said it will be sending tanks. Omar Marques/Getty Images hide caption

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Omar Marques/Getty Images

Former Vice President Mike Pence, shown here last month in Rock Hill, S.C., stored a "small number" of documents bearing classified markings in his Indiana home after having been "inadvertently" boxed up. They have been collected by the FBI. Meg Kinnard/AP hide caption

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Meg Kinnard/AP

Penny Harrison and her son Parker Harrison rally outside the U.S. Capitol during the Senate Judiciary Committee's Ticketmaster hearing on Tuesday morning. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Senate's Ticketmaster hearing featured plenty of Taylor Swift puns and protesters

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In this May 2022 file photo, Fulton County Superior Court Judge Robert McBurney speaks during proceedings to seat a special purpose grand jury in Fulton County, Ga., to look into the actions of former President Donald Trump and his supporters who tried to overturn the results of the 2020 election. Ben Gray/AP hide caption

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Ben Gray/AP

A Georgia judge weighs release of a grand jury report into 2020 election interference

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Jeff Zients removes his mask in this file photo from April 13, 2021. President Biden has decided to choose his former COVID-19 response coordinator as his new chief of staff, replacing Ron Klain. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

A sign held up by a demonstrator says "MOORE V. HARPER: A WEAPON TO OVERTURN ELECTIONS" at a December rally outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. Mariam Zuhaib/AP hide caption

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Mariam Zuhaib/AP

The Supreme Court is weighing a theory that could upend elections. Here's how

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President Biden leaves Saint Edmond Catholic Church in Rehoboth Beach, Del., after attending Mass on Jan. 21. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

The News Corp. building in New York City, home to Fox News. Kevin Hagen/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Hagen/Getty Images

Fox News' defense in defamation suit invokes debunked election-fraud claims

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Since the Dobbs decision in June, clinics providing abortions in what are now restrictive states have had to reinvent what they do. Shannon Brewer, pictured here in 2019 at the Jackson Women's Health Organization, now runs a clinic in Las Cruces, N.M., where abortion is legal. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

50 years after Roe v. Wade, many abortion providers are changing how they do business

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Abortion-rights protesters shout into the Senate chamber in the Indiana Capitol on July 25, 2022, about a month after Roe was overturned, in Indianapolis. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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For those on Capitol Hill who would threaten a default as a means to compel concessions on policy, the destructive power of default is what makes it makes attractive as a tactic. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

The U.S. Supreme Court is seen in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, the day the court released a report on its investigation into a leaked draft opinion in May 2022. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Protesters at the March for Life on Jan. 20, 2023, in Washington D.C. Eman Mohammed for NPR hide caption

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Eman Mohammed for NPR

At the first March for Life post-Roe, anti-abortion activists say fight isn't over

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Clockwise: California Democratic Reps. Barbara Lee, Ro Khanna, Katie Porter and Adam Schiff are expected to battle it out for Sen. Dianne Feinstein's seat in 2024 if she retires. Porter is the only one who has formally announced a run, but Lee is expected to make an announcement soon, while Schiff and Khanna are still contemplating the 2024 race. Jonathan Ernst; Andrew Harnik; Chip Somodevilla; Apu Gomes/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Ernst; Andrew Harnik; Chip Somodevilla; Apu Gomes/Getty Images

Maricopa County Recorder Stephen Richer speaks about voting machine malfunctions at the county elections center in Phoenix on Nov. 9, 2022. Olivier Touron/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Touron/AFP via Getty Images

An Arizona official has a plan to speed up election results. Not everyone is on board

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President Biden visited Aptos, Calif., Thursday, to tour damage caused by the recent series of storms. He told reporters he has no regrets about how he and his lawyers have handled the discovery and disclosure of classified documents found at his former office and personal residence. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

The Marshal of the Supreme Court is unable to identify a person who leaked the Dobbs decision, according to a Supreme Court release Thursday. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images