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Women carry shopping bags as customers visit the American Mall dream mall during Black Friday on Nov. 25, 2022 in East Rutherford, N.J. The U.S. economy ended 2022 on a strong note, but fears of a recession are growing. Kena Betancur/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/Getty Images

Former Fox News staffer Laura Luhn sued the network yesterday alleging years of sexual abuse by its former chairman, the late Roger Ailes. Ailes is shown above in July 2016 outside Fox's New York City headquarters shortly before his ouster. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Zipporah Kuria, of London, carries a photo of her deceased father Joseph Waithaka as she walks into federal court for the Boeing arraignment hearing in Fort Worth, Texas on Thursday. Waithaka was killed in 2019 crash of a Boeing 737 Max airliner. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 25: Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL) listens during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol Building on January 25, 2023 in Washington, DC. Senate Republicans held the news conference to discuss the ongoing negotiations between the House, Senate and White House over the national debt ceiling. (Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Want a balanced federal budget? It'll cost you.

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Joshua Browder's artificial intelligence startup, DoNotPay, planned to have an AI-powered bot argue on behalf of a defendant in a case next month, but he says threats from bar associations have made him drop the effort. Provided by Joshua Browder hide caption

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Provided by Joshua Browder

A Tesla charging station stands in a parking lot in Springfield, Va., on Jan. 17. The automaker decreased the prices of Teslas by up to 20%, a move seen as a reaction to competition in the global market for electric vehicles and rising inflation rates. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Suspending former President Donald Trump's account was the most high-profile and controversial content moderation decision Facebook parent Meta has ever made. Alon Skuy/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alon Skuy/AFP via Getty Images

Meta allows Donald Trump back on Facebook and Instagram

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NPR and The New York Times have asked a Delaware judge to consider unsealing hundreds of documents in Dominion Voting Systems' $1.6 billion dollar defamation lawsuit against Fox News. Timothy A. Clary /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary /AFP via Getty Images

Yellow tape marks bullet holes on a tree and a portrait and flowers create a makeshift memorial, at the site where Palestinian-American Al-Jazeera journalist Shireen Abu Akleh was shot and killed in the West Bank city of Jenin, May 19, 2022. Majdi Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Majdi Mohammed/AP

A new Gallup report finds employee engagement in need of a rebound, finding only 32% of U.S. workers to be engaged with their work. Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop hide caption

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Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop

America, we have a problem. People aren't feeling engaged with their work

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Michel Euler/AP

A big bank's big mistake, explained

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Live Nation CEO Michael Rapino, left, testifies to a Senate subcommittee on Feb. 24, 2009 over the proposed, and ultimately successful, merger between his company and Ticketmaster. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Senators slam Ticketmaster over bungling of Taylor Swift tickets, question breakup

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A worker walks along a path at Googles Bay View campus in Mountain View, Calif., on June 27, 2022. Noah Berger/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noah Berger/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. files second antitrust suit against Google's ad empire, seeks to break it up

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