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Bridgette Burton (left) Stephanie Ybarra and Rachael Erichsen all work at Baltimore Center Stage. Sydney J. Allen for NPR hide caption

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Sydney J. Allen for NPR

Working in theater is a grind. But it doesn't have to be

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A man walks past OPEC headquarters in Vienna on Tuesday on the eve of the 45th meeting of the Joint Ministerial Monitoring Committee and the 33rd OPEC and non-OPEC Ministerial Meeting. The in-person meeting of OPEC members led by Saudi Arabia and allied members headed by Russia will be the first in the Austrian capital since the spring of 2020. Joe Klamar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Klamar/AFP via Getty Images

Russia and Saudi Arabia agree to massive cuts to oil output. Here's why it matters

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DANIEL LEAL/AFP via Getty Images

A Marshall Plan for Ukraine

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Acting Federal Aviation Administrator Billy Nolen at a news conference at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport. A new FAA rule calling for longer rest times for airline flight attendants between flights. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Flight attendants to get more rest time under a new FAA rule

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The Onion head writer Mike Gillis submitted an amicus brief to the U.S. Supreme Court this week. He says he hopes it will convince the court to take up an Ohio man's First Amendment case while educating the broader public. Mike Gillis hide caption

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Mike Gillis

Billionaire Elon Musk has told Twitter he's willing to buy the company after all, and at the originally agreed upon price of $54.20 per share. CHRIS DELMAS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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CHRIS DELMAS/AFP via Getty Images

Elon Musk says he's willing to buy Twitter after all

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Paul Riley, seen here in July 2020, is among the former NWSL coaches whose behavior is detailed in the investigative report by Sally Q. Yates into abuse in the league. Maddie Meyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Goodwill Industries International Inc., the 120-year-old nonprofit organization that operates 3,300 stores in the U.S., and Canada, has launched an online venture called GoodwillFinds. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Tesla CEO Elon Musk has proposed a peace plan for Ukraine that would involve holding repeat votes under the U.N. auspices in Russia-occupied regions. Patrick Pleul/Pool via AP, File hide caption

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Patrick Pleul/Pool via AP, File

A ceremony to dedicate a monument to journalist, educator, and civil rights leader, Ida B. Wells is held on June 30, 2021 in the Bronzeville neighborhood of Chicago. The monument was created by sculptor Richard Hunt. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

This is one of several leaks in the Nord Stream pipelines running between Russia and Germany. Methane from the leaks could have a powerful warming effect on the Earth's atmosphere. AP hide caption

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AP
Megan Varner/Getty Images

AAPI and the problems of categorizing race

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Home prices and the pace of home sales are falling nationally as higher mortgage rates cool the housing market. Sorbetto/Getty Images hide caption

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Sorbetto/Getty Images

As Mortgage Rates Climb, A Hot Housing Market Cools

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McKinsey & Company management consulting firm operates in more than 60 countries. Fabrice Coffrini /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini /AFP via Getty Images

How McKinsey cashed in by consulting for both companies and their regulators

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Kim Kardashian, who is charged with violating federal securities laws, has agreed to pay a $1 million fine to the S.E.C. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

SEC charges Kim Kardashian for unlawfully touting crypto on her Instagram account

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British Prime Minister Liz Truss at the Conservative Party annual conference in Birmingham, England on Sunday. Truss and her Treasury chief have spent the last 10 days defending the cut in the face of market mayhem. Stefan Rousseau/AP hide caption

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Stefan Rousseau/AP
Michael Raines/Getty Images

The markets are down. Here's how to handle your investments

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Marchers raise picket signs during a "Fight Starbucks' Union Busting" rally held in Seattle in April. Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

Starbucks workers have unionized at record speed; many fear retaliation now

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Tourists by the boulevard at a Black Sea resort in Odesa, Ukraine, on Sept. 3. Tourists are not allowed to enter the public beach due to the presence of land mines and other explosives. Dominika Zarzycka/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Dominika Zarzycka/NurPhoto via Getty Images

With Ukraine at war, officials hope to bring tourism back to areas away from fighting

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Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on September 23, 2022 in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A bad year for Wall Street gets even worse, as stock markets finish September down

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