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"Our nation's educational institutions should be places where we not only accept differences, but celebrate them," U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona, seen in the East Room of the White House in August 2023, said of the new Title IX regulation. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg listens at news conference in New York, Feb. 7, 2023. Donald Trump has made history as the first former president to face criminal charges. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Alvin Bragg, Manhattan's district attorney, draws friends close and critics closer

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Kahlil Brown, 18, says teammate Deshaun Hill Jr., the student and quarterback who was shot and killed in 2022, was his best friend. Brown, shown posing for a portrait at the North Community High School football field in Minneapolis on April 9, will attend St. Olaf College in the fall. Caroline Yang for NPR hide caption

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Caroline Yang for NPR

Where gun violence is common, some students say physical safety is a top concern

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The CDC and FDA are investigating reports of patients in nearly a dozen U.S. states being injected with counterfeit Botox. Jens Kalaene/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Jens Kalaene/picture alliance via Getty Images

There's more plastic waste in the world than ever. So, where did the idea come from that individuals, rather than corporations, should keep the world litter-free? Tim Boyle/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Boyle/Getty Images

NYPD officers detain a person as pro-Palestinian protesters gather outside of Columbia University in New York City on Thursday. Officers cleared out a pro-Palestinian campus demonstration, a day after university officials testified about anti-Semitism before Congress. Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump speaks at a rally outside Schnecksville Fire Hall in Schnecksville, Pennsylvania. Andrew Harnik/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/Getty Images

Trump's anti-abortion stance helped him win in 2016. Will it hurt him in 2024?

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Audience members listen to public comment at a special session of the Oakland City Council about a resolution calling for an immediate cease-fire in Gaza on Nov. 27, 2023, in Oakland, Calif. D. Ross Cameron/AP hide caption

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D. Ross Cameron/AP

Gaza cease-fire resolutions roil U.S. local communities

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A man walks by flowers and a sign of support for the community, Oct. 28, 2023, in the wake of the mass shootings that occurred on in Lewiston, Maine. The Maine Legislature on Thursday approved sweeping gun safety legislation nearly six months after the deadliest shooting in state history. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

In March, mom Indira Navas learned that her son Andres, 6, was kicked off of Florida Medicaid, while her daughter, Camila, 12, was still covered. The family is one of millions dealing with Medicaid red tape this year. Javier Ojeda hide caption

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Javier Ojeda

A father helps his son steady a firearm at the National Rifle Association (NRA) annual convention on May 28, 2022, in Houston, Texas. Exposing children to guns comes with risks, but some firearms enthusiasts say they'd prefer to train kids to use guns responsibly. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Amid concerns about kids and guns, some say training is the answer

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Some baby boomers would like to downsize from their large homes, but say it doesn't make financial sense. Single-family homes in Dumfries, Va., are seen here last year. Amanda Andrade-Rhoades/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Amanda Andrade-Rhoades/The Washington Post via Getty Images

A lethal injection gurney is seen at the at Nevada State Prison, a former penitentiary in Carson City, Nev., in 2022. Emily Najera for NPR hide caption

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Emily Najera for NPR

States botched more executions of Black prisoners. Experts think they know why

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Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump walks with Poland's President Andrzej Duda at Trump Tower in midtown Manhattan in New York on Wednesday, April 17, 2024. Stefan Jeremiah/AP hide caption

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Stefan Jeremiah/AP

Sen. Jerry Moran, R-Kansas, center left, and Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., attend a news conference with dozens of women and girls who were sexually abused by Larry Nassar, a former doctor for Michigan State University athletics and USA Gymnastics, July 24, 2018, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Salman Rushdie (April 8, 2024). Nickolai Hammar/NPR hide caption

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Nickolai Hammar/NPR